The Power of ‘Oxi’

Yesterday a decisive 61.3% of Greek voters chose to reject the draconian terms offered to their government after fraught negotiations over bailout funds. They had been asked by Eurozone leaders to meekly accept further raids on their pensions, the only income keeping many households going after the destruction of the welfare system. They had been asked to to accept further erosion of protections for those lucky enough to stay in a job. They were told that failure to do so would lead to their expulsion from the Eurozone and the stability that the currency union is supposed to offer.

In another country, any other European country, there would have been a ‘Yes’ vote. (I expected Greece to vote yes.) Or more likely, the people would have never been offered a referendum at all. The Syriza-led government should not be criticised for consulting its people about its economic future. Greece has tried technocratic government and for obvious reasons decided that accountability was too important to suspend in times of financial difficulty.

Some in positions of power were no doubt hoping the past week would scare the Greeks of a ‘No’ vote. The country became insolvent. Capital controls were imposed, with withdrawal limits of just €60 a day from bank accounts. At the moment in Greece, you cannot buy music on iTunes because purchases count as money leaving the country. The message from ‘Yes’ supporters was clear: this is just the beginning. That message would have cut through anywhere else, but not in Greece.

As alarming as the past week has been, and the threat of effective expulsion from the Eurozone is, five years of the emaciation of Greek society has created more than enough people with nothing left to lose, particularly the young. They couldn’t be blackmailed. Voting ‘No’ offered them hopes of a better deal or at the least the prospect of economic recovery after conversion to a devalued New Drachma- a long shot at a brighter future, but at least some chance. And of course a chance to damage those who have inflicted austerity on them. Voting ‘Yes’ offered them more pain and an assurance that the Eurogroup would maybe think about relieving the country of some of its crushing €300 billion debt burden. But probably by too little and conditional on even more cuts. Who can blame them for voting no?

The resignation of the controversial Greek finance minister should be seen as a chance to reopen talks between Greece and its creditors. I hope the latter, especially the German government, will act reasonably. They know that Greece’s banks need a cash injection urgently, and they might try to demand capitulation on pain of allowing Greece’s financial system to crash. But the government now has a watertight mandate, and such a strategy will backfire as its people will not bear any cost to remain in the Eurozone. Such a Grexit would cause another financial wobble throughout the European economy and might well bring down the German government.

The best course of action is to negotiate a new bailout deal for Greece that works with the country to grow its economy and brings its debt down to a manageable level. The Greek people need to see that there is hope and a future for them within the Eurozone.

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